-->
  Welcome, Guest. Please Login or Register
  Association of Systematic Kinesiology for genuine applied kinesiology techniques for mental and physical health
Registered Charity No: 299 306
  HomeHelpSearchLoginRegisterBroadcast Message to Admin(s)  
 
Page Index Toggle Pages: 1
Send Topic Print
Trauma Centre Belfast - Article from Maggie McBride (Read 19291 times)
Forum Admin
YaBB Administrator
*****
Offline



Posts: 19
Trauma Centre Belfast - Article from Maggie McBride
05.06.09 at 13:56:18
Alert Board Moderator about this Post! 
Late last year in the Association’s Newsletter was a short article offering payment for members to be paid at £20 per session for four sessions a week, to work in a conventional medical setting such as a health centre for a 6 month period.  This seemed to me like a really exciting opportunity but I didn’t have any contacts with local health centres not even my own.  However, I did know people involved in the newly formed North and West Belfast Trauma team and so I approached them to see if they would be interested in having a Kinesiologist working with them. The response from the manager was very positive she herself went to Kinesiology on a regular basis and understood the benefits.

The Trauma Resource Centre is the first multidisciplinary unit to be set up despite the 30 year conflict which took place here the consequences of which are still on going.  The centre is a 3 year funded project and is not part of mainstream health service funding.  The aim of the centre is to improve the accessibility and quality of treatment for those individuals, children and families residents in North and West Belfast who have been affected by conflict-related trauma.  The trauma team consists of 3 full-time Trauma Counsellors, 1 full-time Occupational Therapist, 1 part-time Clinical Psychologist, 1 part-time Physiotherapist 2 Administration Staff and the manager who also is a trauma counsellor.

North and West Belfast contains areas of high social deprivation and also suffered one of the highest deaths tolls of any area during the conflict.  At this point I feel it is necessary to say a little about the troubled background of Northern Ireland what was colloquially known as the Troubles, officially ended when a peace agreement known as the Good Friday Agreement was signed in 1998.  Many people were traumatised by the conflict but it but it is only with the development of a peace process that most people have been able to acknowledge their own personal traumatisation.   As one report puts it: ’for many, the (IRA and Loyalist) cease-fire periods have offered an opportunity to begin to acknowledge trauma and hurt sustained in the past and this has been reflected in an increase in referral rates’ (Social Services Inspectorate, 1998:5 quoted in Traumatised by peace? By Chris Gilligan Policy & Politics vol. 34 no 2 ).

This is the case for some of The Trauma Resource Centres clients and the Centre provides a safe place to explore the impact on themselves and their families of loved ones who have been murdered and the impact of how the family was treated by security forces or other bodies who were supposed to help and whether or not any perpetrator was ever brought to justice.

However, for many clients the violent incidents they have been involved in are of a much more recent origin.  In some areas paramilitary organisations are in control, or wield a great deal of influence and in some areas it is still seen as unacceptable to involve the police in their community.  So often young men we see at the Centre may have been “dealt with by paramilitary” organisations. This can include punishment shootings; beatings, torture and death threats.  Paramilitary organisations can also be involved in criminal activities and clients may have been held hostage at gun point in their own homes and then forced through intimidation to carry out an act against their will.  Clients are also seen who have been victims of state violence including torture.

It is very significant that people who have been traumatised from whatever background can seek help without judgement.

Most clients at the centre will have been diagnosed with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder which Babette Rothschild in her book “The Body Remembers” describes as a condition which: “disrupts the functioning of those afflicted by it, interfering with their abilities to meet daily needs and perform the most basic tasks.  In PTSD a traumatic event is not remembered and relegated to one’s past in the same way as other life events.  Trauma continues to intrude with visual, auditory, and/or other somatic reality on the lives of its victims.  Again and again they relieve the life-threatening experiences they have suffered, reacting in mind and body as though such events were still occurring.”   But PTSD does not effect the just the mind and many other physical symptoms such as skin disorders and Irritable Bowel Syndrome are now being more widely recognised as being stress (emotionally) related. 

One of the first clients I saw at the Centre had the worst case of adult eczema I had seen and his consultant was proposing a treatment which was so severe it would require a weekly liver function test.  The treatment was due to start in 2 months time when he had his next hospital appointment and up till then we would be able to have weekly sessions.  The client responded really well to Kinesiology and continued his sessions with his Psychologist and with the teams Occupational Therapist who worked wonders to improve his living conditions.  When he returned to the hospital the consultant felt he had improved so much that it would not be necessary to carry out such a treatment. 

It has been a great experience to be working as part of a team. Feedback from the clients I’ve seen has meant that the other team members refer clients to me, sometimes with specific requests.   For example, one woman was for the first time dealing with the traumatic experiences of her past and was finding this very difficult, and, her counsellor asked me to stay in the present with her.  Kinesiology sessions were arranged after her counselling to close down any feelings of upset and to calm the client.  This has not been restrictive for me, I have felt part of a team with differing skills doing their utmost to improve a client’s well-being.  The work is hard but very rewarding and also reminds me that self-care is important and after a bath with lots of Bach Flower remedies I make sure to take the time out to do Kinesiology on myself.

The most frustrating aspect of the work has been the number of clients who simply do not show up for their appointment and figures suggest this is as high as 50%.  It has been a better attendance rate for Kinesiology but much higher than I experience working with the general public.  However, I am experiencing a lot more clients phoning to cancel appointments and taking the initiative themselves to make additional appointments. My weekly timesheets have reflected 4 neat appointments but this is achieved by sometimes seeing a lot more than 4 clients in one week being balanced against the weeks when I see fewer. I work in a community setting aside one day a week and some clients prefer to see me there some because it is geographically closer to them but some because they find the informal atmosphere more relaxing.  Another great aspect of the Centre is having administrative back-up and the staff is great at making phone calls and writing letters to set up and remind people of their appointments they have been a huge help.   Because people in the centre have been talking about Kinesiology I have seen a number of clients who have made appointments as a direct result of the work I am doing in the Trauma Resource Centre.

That Kinesiology has proved a useful and effective tool in the treatment of trauma will not be a great surprise to any of us who work with this powerful and effective healthcare system, but it has been very satisfying for me to see this in practise. The Trustee’s intention in offering grants to members to work in this way was to increase the number of people who had experienced Kinesiology.  I hope in some small way that I have contributed to spreading the word about Kinesiology.  I have really enjoyed this challenging experience.

It was an inspirational idea on behalf of the Association and I want to offer them a huge thank-you for affording me this opportunity.   I would also like to thank Helen Hughes the Kinesiologist who helped me so much and made this journey possible.

Trustee’s note: the offer of payment to an ASK Diplomate working within the NHS is still available.  For further details please contact the ASK office, contact details at the end of the newsletter.
Back to top
 
 
IP Logged
 
Forum Admin
YaBB Administrator
*****
Offline



Posts: 19
Re: Trauma Centre Belfast - Article from Maggie McBride
Reply #1 - 05.06.09 at 14:04:52
Alert Board Moderator about this Post! 
Evaluation of Kinesiology Service and Proposal for Kinesiology to continue to be a Valuable Part of the Multi-Disciplinary Approach to the Treatment of Trauma at the Trauma Resource Centre


Kinesiology is a complementary therapy concerned with rebalancing the energy system of the body by evaluating and treating an individual's structural, chemical and mental aspects. It employs muscle testing and other standard methods of diagnosis and therapeutically utilizes nutrition, manipulation, diet, acupressure, exercise and education to help restore balance and harmony.

In February 2005 Ms Maggie McBride (Dip. A.S.K. Cert. Counselling, BACP, EMDR Level 1 & 2) offered 4 hours, i.e. 4 therapeutic sessions per week to clients already attending the Trauma Resource Centre who were manifesting significant health problems i.e. lowered immune system, digestive problems, skin problems etc. This service has continued successfully for 2 years, complementing and enhancing the therapeutic process with benefits to both clients and the team.

During their Kinesiology session's clients are educated as to how their dysfunctional assumptions or ineffective core beliefs affect their physical and emotional health and block recovery. This supports, facilitates and enhances the therapy offered by the multi-disciplinary team. Individual Kinesiology sessions also reveal problems such as lutritional deficits, spinal misalignments, organs with low energy, and systems that Ire out of balance as well as treatments for the problem.

EVALUATION

Since February 2005

263 sessions of Kinesiology sessions have been attended 29 different clients have received a course of Kinesiology 7 clients are currently on the Kinesiology waiting list.

compiled and written by Geraldine Hamilton, Clinical Specialist Occupational Therapist, Belfast Health & social, Trauma Resource Centre, January 2008
Back to top
 
 
IP Logged
 
Page Index Toggle Pages: 1
Send Topic Print